Insider's Guide to Spas
Four Seasons Jackson Hole

Resorts

Four Seasons Resort Jackson Hole

Rima Suqi


If you can only experience one spa while visiting Jackson Hole, it should be the Four Seasons. I know what you’re thinking—that of course I’d choose one of the pricier options, at a fancy resort, by default. While another spa might have a slightly more extensive treatment menu, or better retail, or a fabulous view from the waiting area, the Four Seasons wins for overall excellence—by a mile.

If you’re a skier, you probably know that this resort is the only ski-in, ski-out in Teton Village, with an extensive kid’s program. There’s free valet parking, as well as shuttles to other hotels in the area. This has nothing to do with the spa itself, but it is worth noting. As are the indoor and outdoor heated pools, and five separate hot tubs, available to hotel guests regardless of whether they are using the spa.

The 11,685-square-foot spa has 16 treatment rooms, including two private spa suites, each with a Swiss shower, soaking tub, and fireplace. I sadly didn’t experience a suite, but it’s probably best, as I might not have ever left.

If you’re a skier, you probably know that this resort is the only ski-in, ski-out in Teton Village, with an extensive kid’s program. There’s free valet parking, as well as shuttles to other hotels in the area. This has nothing to do with the spa itself, but it is worth noting. As are the indoor and outdoor heated pools, and five separate hot tubs . . .

The locker room is carpeted, spacious, and smells good. Lockers are a bit small to fit all your stuff, especially if winter boots are involved, but that was a problem at every spa I visited here. The minute I set eyes on the fireplace that’s located in the (indoor) hot tub, steam room, and sauna area, I no longer cared about that. It’s a really elegant and unexpected touch. This area also has a cold plunge and two showers— a thoughtful touch for those, like me, who are avid users of same.

There’s another fireplace in the ladies lounge, which they call the “tranquility lounge,” where you wait to be picked up for your treatment. It is decorated in a rustic style with twig furniture and burgundy throw blankets on every chair. A lovely selection of current (key word) magazines is available for your perusal; a wooden bowl is filled with perfect apples that are all the same size, tea is offered, as well as homemade energy bars. Other interesting touches include a stone inscribed with the word “garbage” set near a receptacle intended for that use.

Overall—elegant, accommodating, and not overcrowded. Win-win-win.

Here’s a link to Rima’s review of the Peak Performance treatment she experienced at the spa.

 

 

Rima Suqi

Rima Suqi

An avid world traveler raised in an international home, Rima has explored and covered emerging destinations in the Middle East and Africa, far-flung luxury resorts in French Polynesia, as well as those closer to home, and the burgeoning arts scene in Marfa, Texas. Rima has traveled to over 30 countries, writing about the trends and tastemakers for leading travel and lifestyle publications, and subjected herself to innumerable spa treatments — sometimes under very odd circumstances — all in the name of journalism. A weekly contributor to The New York Times Home section, Rima held the envious position of Best Bets Editor at New York Magazine for six years, and is regularly published in national magazines including T Magazine/The New York Times, Departures, Architectural Digest, Elle Décor and American Way. Her last book American Fashion: Designers at Home (Assouline) in partnership with CFDA, sold out three printings.