Insider's Guide to Spas
Four Seasons Jackson Hole

Treatments

Peak Performance


The Treatment: Peak Performance

Time & Cost: 50 minutes, $175; 80 minutes, $250

The spa brochure describes this treatment like this:

A recovery treatment customized to address any muscle issues you might be experiencing after a day of adventure in Jackson Hole. This ritual incorporates active stretching and therapeutic massage with arnica oil and enzymatic preparations used to soothe and re-energize the muscle tissue.

There are two kinds of treatments in my book:

#1 The therapist is technically very good, but not necessarily in tune with you, the person on the table. This is perfectly fine and acceptable.

#2 The therapist is one of those extraordinary human beings who can read you and your body, and know what you need, even if you don’t know what you need. This is a gift. It’s also what I experienced when I spent 50 minutes with Robbin during this treatment at the Four Seasons Resort, Jackson Hole.

The Peak Performance description, per the spa brochure, seems to peg the treatment to skiers who clearly need a little respite. I am not a skier, but had had a stressful few days driving in gale force winds and full on snow, and I, too, needed a mental as well as a physical respite.

Robbin explained the treatment, adding that she is a shiatsu practitioner, does energy massage, as well as lymphatic drainage, and said that during the treatment she would do energy work on my meridians. She also offered several enhancements to the treatments (at an additional charge) that included cupping. I’m a huge fan of both meridian work and cupping, but never expected either, much less both, to be offered here. Major bonus. Because of restrictions on open flame usage, cupping here is of the manual variety, but I honestly couldn’t tell the difference.

I’m a huge fan of both meridian work and cupping, but never expected either, much less both, to be offered here. Major bonus. Because of restrictions on open flame usage, cupping here is of the manual variety, but I honestly couldn’t tell the difference.

During my all-too-short 50 minutes with her, she dry-brushed my body for detoxification, did some lymphatic drainage massage on my face, what she called a “muscle ballet” treatment—a series of stretches on the table, similar to Thai massage done on a table, some shiatsu massage using arnica and other herbs that help reduce muscle inflammation, and cupping. I’m sure there were a few other things thrown into that glorious mix as well.

It was a mash-up of sorts that seemed very tailored to my needs. Afterwards I was presented with Hail Merry vegan macaroons, which sounds totally unappealing, but which were delicious. I bought two bags—and some tea, as well as an unofficial prescription of Turmeric pills for joint health.

Would this treatment have been so fabulous with a different practitioner? I doubt it. Consider this an enthusiastic endorsement for Robbin, as well as for Peak Performance.

Best For: Everybody.

Drawbacks: I wish it were longer!

Here’s a link to Rima’s review of the spa at Four Seasons Jackson Hole:

FourSeasonsResortJacksonHole

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rima Suqi

Rima Suqi

An avid world traveler raised in an international home, Rima has explored and covered emerging destinations in the Middle East and Africa, far-flung luxury resorts in French Polynesia, as well as those closer to home, and the burgeoning arts scene in Marfa, Texas. Rima has traveled to over 30 countries, writing about the trends and tastemakers for leading travel and lifestyle publications, and subjected herself to innumerable spa treatments — sometimes under very odd circumstances — all in the name of journalism. A weekly contributor to The New York Times Home section, Rima held the envious position of Best Bets Editor at New York Magazine for six years, and is regularly published in national magazines including T Magazine/The New York Times, Departures, Architectural Digest, Elle Décor and American Way. Her last book American Fashion: Designers at Home (Assouline) in partnership with CFDA, sold out three printings.