Insider's Guide to Spas
mii amo
mii amo

Treatments

Spirit of the New Moon

Rima Suqi


The Treatment:
Spirit of the New Moon

Time & Cost:
90 minutes, $250

I entered a room with a panoramic window looking out at the gorgeous red rocks’ formations of Boynton canyon. In one corner of the room was a small table, set with a gold pen and a couple sheets of parchment paper. My therapist asked me to think about what I’d like to create or manifest for myself in the coming lunar cycle and beyond – then left the room so I could write my wishes on the parchment paper. She lit a votive candle set in a beautiful chunky agate crystal, and put the paper with my “wishes” under the candle, where they remained for the duration of the 90-minute treatment.

I turned the chair around and put my feet in a luminous red bowl, filled with warm water and over 50 types of crystals. The color of the bowl was significant, as red represents the root chakra – how we view and walk through this world – and is meant to open and ground that chakra in preparation for the treatment. My feet were massaged and wrapped in hot towels. Then I got on the table for a 60-minute massage, which included a heavenly 10 minutes spent on my head and scalp, meant to clear the energy of the crown chakra.

The end of the treatment was, perhaps, the best. I removed the papers from beneath the candle, rolled them up and tied them with a leather string. I was then asked to put them in a small blessing bowl, made locally by Native Americans. The papers remain in this bowl for 30 days, and are then buried in Boynton Canyon.

Best For:
Anyone into spiritual ritual. Many feel that writing down what you want is the first step towards making it happen (which, sadly, never seems to be on our own schedule!). What better place to be than a sacred Native American site that also happens to be home to one of the famous vortexes of this area. It’s a Spiritual “power center” – which can’t be a bad thing.

Drawbacks:
This treatment is only offered on days around the new moon, meaning it will not be offered every day. (This may be the spa world’s first authentic “Pop-Up” treatment!)

Rima Suqi

Rima Suqi

An avid world traveler raised in an international home, Rima has explored and covered emerging destinations in the Middle East and Africa, far-flung luxury resorts in French Polynesia, as well as those closer to home, and the burgeoning arts scene in Marfa, Texas. Rima has traveled to over 30 countries, writing about the trends and tastemakers for leading travel and lifestyle publications, and subjected herself to innumerable spa treatments — sometimes under very odd circumstances — all in the name of journalism. A weekly contributor to The New York Times Home section, Rima held the envious position of Best Bets Editor at New York Magazine for six years, and is regularly published in national magazines including T Magazine/The New York Times, Departures, Architectural Digest, Elle Décor and American Way. Her last book American Fashion: Designers at Home (Assouline) in partnership with CFDA, sold out three printings.