Insider's Guide to Spas
Amangani, Jackson Hole

Resorts

Amangani

Rima Suqi


Jackson Hole really threw me. I never thought it would be a spiritual place akin to some spots in Arizona or Hawaii, but it turns out that this ridiculously gorgeous area attracts some very legit healers. Who knew? I had treatments with two such people at the spa at Amangani. Surprise again.

While Amangani is a destination resort, the spa is not a destination spa. It is a nice spa in a very nice hotel with killer views.

There are four treatment rooms, all clad in Pacific Redwood, creating a chic rustic aesthetic. One room is dedicated to facials, waxing, and lash tinting (but no lash extensions—for those, head to Chill Spa at Terra) and there’s a wet room for salt scrubs and wraps. Note: the state of Wyoming does not require that massage therapists be licensed, but Amangani does, and all their therapists are licensed.

The locker room is small and stylish, with wooden bear key fobs and the only steam room I encountered in this town with clearly marked controls. There’s no waiting room to speak of, but there is an amazing heated outdoor lap pool and hot tub with incredible, unobstructed views of the Teton mountain range. This alone is worth the trip, and the cost of a treatment, for those not staying in the hotel.

. . . there is an amazing heated outdoor lap pool and hot tub with incredible, unobstructed views of the Teton mountain range. This alone is worth the trip, and the cost of a treatment, for those not staying in the hotel.

But it would be a shame, as the rooms at Amangani are very thoughtfully designed and appointed, with radiant heat, fireplaces, and a bed that can be heated. There’s a surreptitious surge protector—black to blend in with the décor—perfectly placed near the side of the bed. A blow dryer was also perfectly placed (and plugged in, at just the right height) on a shelf in the bathroom. The closet is one of the largest I’ve encountered in a hotel room, and besides more having more hangers than I needed (that never happens), there was also a backpack for guest use. A selection of current magazines was set out for my perusal, and a bowl of three perfect oranges was set out for healthy snacking.

And the views—you’ve got them from every possible spot in the room, including the toilet, the bathtub, the shower, the bed, the daybed, and the generously sized balcony. Just one drawback: the wind. It can be very intense in winter—if you’re a light sleeper, earplugs are a must.

 

 

 

 

 

Rima Suqi

Rima Suqi

An avid world traveler raised in an international home, Rima has explored and covered emerging destinations in the Middle East and Africa, far-flung luxury resorts in French Polynesia, as well as those closer to home, and the burgeoning arts scene in Marfa, Texas. Rima has traveled to over 30 countries, writing about the trends and tastemakers for leading travel and lifestyle publications, and subjected herself to innumerable spa treatments — sometimes under very odd circumstances — all in the name of journalism. A weekly contributor to The New York Times Home section, Rima held the envious position of Best Bets Editor at New York Magazine for six years, and is regularly published in national magazines including T Magazine/The New York Times, Departures, Architectural Digest, Elle Décor and American Way. Her last book American Fashion: Designers at Home (Assouline) in partnership with CFDA, sold out three printings.